LISTED Film Previews – December 2011

This is it!! The final run down of the year, and what a year its been for films! We’ve had a lot of great films come past us this year, and a lot of terrible ones….. and a lot of ones that looked great but turned out to be terrible and ultimately disappointed me to the extent that I cried. Physically cried. Sad isn’t it? Please Hollywood, stop making disappointing films and just do good ones? Thanks, ‘preciate it…

Anyway, after that short distraction, I should probably mention that you can hear more film reviews, news and previews (and other things that rhyme) on May Contain Spoilers – the Film Review show that knew Soylent Green was People all along! You can “Like” our page on Facebook to get all the latest updates, links to our podcast and pictures of our competition prizes, or you can follow us on Twitter using @FilmSpoilers. And for a taste, you can follow this link to listen to the podcast of our show:

http://maycontainspoilers.jellycast.com/podcast/feed/2

But if you came here for Film Previews to get you in the Christmas mood then… well, there aren’t many Christmas movies out this month. Sorry. But instead, I packed this months previews full of some other awesome stuff instead. Just thinking of you, you know. Enjoy!

SHERLOCK HOLMES: A GAME OF SHADOWS (12A) (Dir. Guy Ritchie)

After the surprise break-out hit of the first film, Guy Ritchie brings back the crime-solving duo of Holmes (Robert Downey Jr) and Watson (Jude Law) for a second action-packed adventure. In A Game of Shadows, Holmes and Watson are pitted against their fiercest adversary and the only man that ever matched Holmes for intellect – Professor Moriarty (Jared Harris). Also returning is Rachel McAdams as Adler and a new addition of Noomi Rapace as Sim (which links to another release this month…) as the group go on a chase across Europe to stop Moriarty’s web of murders. If it’s as smart as the first, you can bet A Game of Shadows will be a massive hit across the board in time for the Christmas break. Released December 16th.

THE THING (15) (Dir. Matthijs van Heijningen Jr.)

Not actually the re-boot that everyone thought it might be, but instead a prequel to the John Carpenter 1982 original, The Thing stars Mary-Elizabeth Winstead as grad student Kate Lloyd working in an Antarctica research facility that has discovered an alien craft. This discovery not only leads to a confrontation between her and her research professor (Ulrich Thomsen), but a series of grizzly goings-on which explain all the events that lead right up to the opening of the original film. Expect big references to the original and plenty of thrills and flame-throwers. Released December 2nd.

PUSS IN BOOTS (PG) (Dir. Chris Miller)

A somewhat tenuous spin-off from the successful Shrek series, Antonio Banderas returns for the origin story of the scene-stealing feline as he teams up with mastermind Humpty Dumpty (Zach Galifianakis) and Kitty (Salma Hayek) to steal the famed Goose that lays Golden Eggs. If you’re a huge follower of the Shrek series or have kids then it might be worth going to see, but the rest of us might remain cautiously sceptical for now. Released December 9th.

MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE – GHOST PROTOCOL (12A) (Dir. Brad Bird)

Having to compete with the possibly more anticipated Girl With the Dragon Tattoo is no easy feat for Ethan Hunt’s (Tom Cruise) fourth outing in the series. Although the M:I series is starting to die out a bit, Ghost Protocol looks like it will be going in a new direction as Hunt’s group must go rogue in order to clear the name of their organisation. Also starring Jeremy Renner before he appears as Hawkeye in The Avengers next year, Ghost Protocol looks to have everything that made the previous films successful, but with a darker edge. Released December 26th.

THE GIRL WITH THE DRAGON TATTOO (15) (Dir. David Fincher)

Gradually becoming a slightly more acceptable American remake than others recently, this version stars Daniel Craig as the journalist Mikael Blomqvist who is aided by wanted computer hacker Lisbeth Salander (Rooney Mara) in his search for a woman who has been missing for 40 years. Although the original Swedish films were a massive hit this side of the Atlantic, the American remake is still sure to bring in crowds due to its much higher filming budget and big name cast/direction team, so it’s probably worth going to see even if it’s just to compare with the originals. Released December 26th.

As published in Listed Magazine and on http://www.listedmagazine.com.

LISTED Film Previews – November 2011

Now, by this point, you’re probably wondering to yourself “How come there have been all these previews of films coming out, and yet we’ve hardly seen ANY actual reviews of these films? Whats going on, Mister? Why are you doing this to us? Whywhy?” Well, I’ll tell you – I’ve been massively busy on other projects in the works (mostly being that I need an actual job so I can afford things… like food…).

One such project I mentioned in a previous post, and that is the new Film Review Radio Show/Internet Podcast I am now a part of called May Contain Spoilers! We go out live every week on Thursday nights at 9, and our podcast follows shortly after in the week so you can catch it even if you didn’t hear it live. To keep up with our shenanigans and stay up to date with our fantastic competitions and news, you can add us on Facebook by searching May Contain Spoilers, on Twitter through @FilmSpoilers or you can e-mail us for information or to suggest a Soundtrack of the Week at maycontainspoilers@thebayradio.com. So come along, have a listen and get involved in the action yourself – its guaranteed to be 100% better than trying to eat a shoe!!

Now that’s done, shall I tell you about what to see this month? Yes. Yes I shall…

THE RUM DIARY (15) (Dir. Bruce Robinson)

Johnny Depp is Paul Kemp, a freelance journalist writing for a newspaper in the Caribbean who finds himself at a critical turning point in his life. As he tries to carve out a niche for himself in the journalistic world of Puerto Rico, he begins to fall in with crowds of lost souls. And if you notice that it bears a resemblance to Fear and Loathing In Las Vegas then you might not be surprised that The Rum Diary is also adapted from a novel by Hunter S. Thompson and written and directed by Bruce Robinson, so you can expect a few trippy scenes here and there. Possibly not for the faint of heart, but definitely for those that enjoy a bit of madness mixed in with their drama. Released November 4th.

IN TIME (12A) (Dir. Andrew Niccol)

Starring Justin Timberlake in an altogether different role, this sci-fi thriller is set in the near future where people stop aging at 25 but can only live for one more year, meaning time is used as currency so the rich stay young forever and the poor die early. But when a young man (Timberlake) finds himself with an abundance of extra time, he is swiftly on the run from an elite police force lead by Cillian Murphey called The Time Keepers. While the trailer seems like Logan’s Run, there may be more to offer than first meets the eye. Released November 1st.

IMMORTALS (15) (Dir. Tarsem Singh)

Appearing at first a bit like 300 Again, Immortals tells the tale of Theseus (Henry Cavill), a mortal man chosen by Zeus (Luke Evans) to lead a fight against King Hyperion (Mickey Rourke), a ruthless leader who is on a rampage through Greece with his disfigured army on a quest to find a weapon that could destroy humanity. While you can expect the action and effects to be just as stylised as 300 or Clash of the Titans, you can also expect more references to Greek mythology and the Greek Gods. While there might be a few reasons to see this in 3D, it’s also a good opportunity to see Henry Cavill in action before he takes on the Superman mantle in next year’s Man of Steel. Released November 11th.

THE TWILIGHT SAGA: BREAKING DAWN – PART 1 (12A) (Dir. Bill Condon)

Those cash-cow teens (and the one that can’t keep his shirt on) are back again for the first part of the final film of the saga. In Part One of Breaking Dawn, we see Bella (Kristen Stewart) finally tie the knot with her sparkly Vampire lover Edward (Robert Pattinson), much to the dismay of muscly wolf-boy Jacob (Taylor Lautner). Only thing is, after returning from their steamy, private honeymoon, Bella discovers she’s pregnant and the Vampire sprog inside of her not only poses a threat to the Quileute Wolf tribe and the Volturi Vampire coven alike, but could also be killing her from the inside. Perhaps it’s a message about abstinence, but at the same time this movie has taken the giant leap from being a cult phenomenon to becoming just a tad ridiculous. Expect lots of teenage angst drama in the build-up towards next year’s final conclusion. Released November 18th.

As published in Listed Magazine and online at http://www.listedmagazine.com. Search “May Contain Spoilers” in Facebook for information on all these films and more.

LISTED Film Previews – October ’11

Another month, and another lot of Film Previews for Listed Magazine. We’ve got a packed month this time round, with Halloween around the corner and the horror films coming out of the woodwork, so get on top of the film viewings in order to keep up! Also remember that you can listen to reviews of all of these films on May Contain Spoilers by listening in at 9pm every Thursday on The Bay Radio, or by listening to our podcasts by searching “May Contain Spoilers” on either Facebook or Jellycast. It’s a better investment than a chocolate teapot! That being said, have a read of these and leave some opinions:

REAL STEEL (12A) (Dir. Shawn Levy)

While it could have the unofficial title of “Rock-‘Em Sock-‘Em Robots: The Movie”, Real Steel looks like it might have something a bit more than the obvious to offer. Hugh Jackman is Charlie Kenton, a one-time famous boxing champ who is now a struggling promoter in a world where humans no longer box, but instead use 2000 pound robots. After Charlie discovers he has an 11 year old son who wants to know his father, they find a common goal training an unlikely champion in an old discarded droid. Sort of mid-way between Transformers and Rocky, it’s easy to see that Real Steel might have the typical father-and-son personal growth storyline, but throw giant boxing robots into the mix and you might just have something original that everyone can enjoy. Plus this looks like it could be the movie Transformers 3 should really have been! Released October 14th.

CONTAGION (12A) (Dir. Steven Soderbergh)

Doing his usual act of releasing two of his own films in one year – one being a big budget feature with big names and one smaller, lesser known one – Contagion is the bigger of the years releases from Mr. Soderbergh. Contagion focuses on an outbreak of an airborne virus that kills anyone infected within days. Panic and fear spread as quickly as the virus epidemic does, and a team from the Centre for Disease Control (including Matt Damon, Marion Cotillard and Laurence Fishburne) race to find a cure for the lethal virus. But the question is, are they able to find a cure before society tears itself apart? It may be more of a psychological thriller than an actual horror, but Contagion could be a surprise Halloween hit this year, so check it out if you want something different. Released October 21st.

THE ADVENTURES OF TINTIN: THE SECRET OF THE UNICORN (PG) (Dir. Steven Spielberg)

Bringing alive the adventures of the original comic books and boasting a big-time writing team of Stephen Moffat, Edgar Wright and Joe Cornish with a big name cast to boot, The Adventures of Tintin will see the intrepid reporter and his dog Snowy in a Robert Zemeckis-style motion capture 3D epic. When Tintin (Jamie Bell) discovers a map to a sunken treasure ship of Captain Haddock’s (Andy Serkis) ancestor, the two set out to find it before the nefarious Red Rackham (Daniel Craig) can get to it first. Definitely for those who aren’t into the Halloween-season films, Tintin could be the first of many treasure-hunting adventures for the boy reporter, so watch out for this one. Released October 26th.

PARANORMAL ACTIVITY 3 (15) (Dir. Henry Joost/Ariel Schulman)

Filling a very noticeable Saw-shaped hole in Halloween film releases this year, Paranormal Activity 3 returns with its trademark low-budget style with major chills. Although the plot is still mostly the stuff of rumour, it looks like the third film will be a direct sequel rather than the planned prequel, but will use “historical videos” from before the first one as part of the story. Whether you’re familiar with the series or not, with little in the way of horror film competition this year you can expect Paranormal Activity 3 to be the film fans will flock to for their frights – watch if you dare! Released October 21st.

As published in Listed Magazine and on http://www.listedmagazine.com – Reviews can be found on the May Contain Spoilers podcast.

Red State (May Contain Spoilers)

Already being a huge fan of Kevin Smith might have helped with this, but I’ve known about this film being made for quite a while now. In fact, rumours of this film started circulating shortly after Zack and Miri Make A Porno came out in 2008, but back then it was rumoured that Red State was going to be a horror film about zombies set in New Jersey. The resulting film actually something of a whole different breed of horror, but still just as scary!

Red State starts out with Smith’s usual style of comedy and focuses on three friends in high school who find a website advertising people who want to have cheap, one night sex with anyone. Accepting an offer of a four-way, the friends go to meet the woman who made the offer only to find it is a trap set up by a group of religious fundamentalists from the radical 5 Points Church. When they wake up, they find out that the church led by head preacher Abin Cooper (Michael Parks) have a much more sinister agenda and are ruthlessly kidnapping and killing people they personally deem to be “sinners”. After local authorities and federal agents get involved, headed by Joseph Keenan (John Goodman), a shoot-out starts up and there’s a deadly choice for the people involved  – stay and be killed by fanatics, or try to escape and risk being shot in the process.

I’ve sort of summed up the premise of this film as “what if the Westborough Baptist Church had guns?” (if you don’t know who they are, you can look them up – they’re not hard to find!) since the fundamentalists of the 5 Points Church in Red State are loosely based around the famous protests of the Westborough Baptist Church who, as it happens, get mentioned at one point in the script and planned to protest the release of this film! So, clearly, Red State has had its fair share of background research gone into it much like Dogma did.

Perhaps what made Red State so interesting for me was that it was so entirely different from Kevin Smith’s usual brand of film that there’s almost no trace of the same director from Jersey Girl or Zack And Miri. And with the roots of this film coming from real life religious followers, it makes Red State all that more scary and slightly horrifying – perhaps making it the kind of horror film Smith intended to make all along.

There are a lot of mixed messages throughout Red State – from the fears of religious fundamentalists to whether the American authorities operate in unexpected and unorthodox ways as a means to an end – as there are a lot of unexpected twists and turns. What perhaps makes Red State a bit of a mould-breaker is that you realise about half-way in that unlike other horror films that this film resembles at some points (go see Texas Chainsaw Massacre), anything can happen to anyone at any point. So, no one is safe. But, that being said, you also realise that you’re not sure who to side with at certain points – whether some of the people in the church aren’t that bad and have just been lead into a situation they didn’t want or whether the authorities are taking things too far in order to save themselves from media coverage. But perhaps that’s the point of Red State from the get-go, that you’re constantly questioning the basic morals of each character and the ways in which they express them. Even at the end, it begins to head down such an unexpected path you find yourself thinking “surely not” at the prospect that the gun-toting God Squad could actually have been right all along.

While there are a couple of extended conversational scenes indulging Smith’s writing side, such as the 10 minutes + scene of Michael Parks preaching to his church or John Goodman talking to his bosses in the aftermath there are some brilliant performances throughout Red State, not to mention Michael Parks who delves so deep into his own character you’d be forgiven for thinking Smith had employed a preacher to do the role, and Kerry Bishé as the grand-daughter to Abin Cooper who tries to do the right thing in the end. While it’s great to see John Goodman in a compelling role again (and looking a lot thinner as well), it’s even better to see these two actors, both fresh and experienced, making their roles so believable in this film.

The fact that Kevin Smith personally distributed and marketed Red State through his podcasting network SModcast and SModcast Internet Radio in the US is probably a testament to how much he believes in this film he’s created, and the fact that he only plans to do one more film before finishing filmmaking for good has become more of a shame than it was before. Red State gets 7 out of 10 for being interesting and gory and a complete change of pace for Kevin Smith all at the same time.

LISTED Film Previews – September 2011 (And a new announcement…)

Another month, and another lot of film previews as appearing regularly in Listed Magazine. BUT WAIT, because there’s more! Not only can you read these previews for free each month, but now you can hear reviews of them on the new Film Review show on The Bay Radio called May Contain Spoilers! We like to think of ourselves as equal measures of film reviews, new film news, music and witty banter – Sort of like Top Gear with Films, perhaps? Either way, you can now listen to us each week on a Thursday night Live on thebayradio.com, or you can go to our Facebook page by searching May Contain Spoilers and listen to our regular podcasts. You can even subscribe to the May Contain Spoilers podcast on iTunes and listen to it whenever you like! Isn’t technology wonderful? Aren’t I good to you for giving you this wonderful gift? Now, have a read of these and go that linkeylink above and show us just how much you love us. Do it, do it, do it now.

FRIGHT NIGHT (15) (Dir. Craig Gillespie)

The long talked-about remake of the original 1985 horror/comedy Fright Night has arrived with a cast list to raise a few hopes for its success. Teenager Charley Brewster (Anton Yelchin) starts becoming suspicious that his new next door neighbour Jerry (Colin Farrell) is connected to a string of recent deaths, and might actually be a real-life Vampire. When no-one else believes him, he enlists the help of the spooky and sinister Peter Vincent (David Tennant), a TV show host as well as magician and self-professed Vampire killer, to help him finally uncover the truth. Also starring such names as Toni Collette and Christopher Mintz-Plasse as “Evil” Ed Thompson, for all the stick Fright Night has received over being yet another Hollywood Remake of a classic film it might actually be able to deliver the goods as far as mixing fights and laughs together goes, so check it out even if it’s just to satisfy your curiosity! Released September 2nd.

APOLLO 18 (15) (Dir. Gonzalo López-Gallego)

The reason we never returned to the moon is now revealed. Recently found, decades-old footage from the abandoned NASA project have been retrieved from inside the black-box, and shows the terrifying events of an alien life form wreaking horror and havoc within the confines of the spacecraft. Or, at least, that’s what the marketing ploy would have you believe! This very cleverly shot film follows the footsteps of previous horror successes like Paranormal Activity and Blair Witch Project, and is guaranteed to give you a few jumps along the way. Although, if you pay attention to what some critics are saying, it might end up being Blair Witch in Space… Released September 2nd.

TROLL HUNTER (12A) (Dir. André Ovredal)

This Norwegian independent film has been building up all kinds of hype on the film festival circuit, mainly for its great mix of a script that references actual Scandinavian folklore with amazingly well done CGI visuals, considering the amount of money put towards this project. A group of students take a film camera into the woods to investigate a series of suspicious bear killings and begin to learn that there are much more dangerous things happening, as they are guided by a mysterious hunter named Hans who turns out to be a Trollhunter. If you enjoyed other low-budget films like Monsters, then you definitely won’t want to miss Troll Hunter! Released September 9th.

CRAZY, STUPID, LOVE (12A) (Dir. Glenn Ficarra/John Requa)

Playing out kind of like a more genuine and touching version of The 40 Year-Old Virgin, Steve Carell stars as Cal Weaver whose wife (Julianne Moore) tells him she has been unfaithful and wants a divorce. Now, as the family man struggles to get back into the singles scene, he meets Jacob (Ryan Gosling), a handsome bachelor who takes on Cal as a protégé and teaches him everything he knows about meeting women and turning him into a new man while also dealing with meeting a game-changer of a woman (Emma Stone). Expect plenty of laughs, but also a deeper and well-told story lying somewhere underneath. Released September 23rd.

As published in Listed Magazine and on http://www.listedmagazine.com

Crazy, Stupid, Love (May Contain Spoilers)

Steve Carell has managed to consistently prove that he is great at what he does, and what he does is a mixture of side-splitting comedy, cringe-worthy moments, and puppy-dog-eyed drama. But the question I put to you is this – can too much of a good thing be bad for you?

In Crazy, Stupid, Love, Steve Carell does his usual thing of being the victim character thrown into an uncomfortable life-style while someone new tries to pick him up, turn him around, and make him into someone new, only for him to find out that the thing he needed the most was there in front of him the whole time. Admittedly, this is a formula that works well for Steve Carell – its tried, its tested, and its proved time and time again that he can pull it off, so why not one more? Crazy, Stupid, Love sees Steve Carell play family man Cal Weaver who, at the start of the film, is told by his wife (Julianne Moore) that she slept with someone else and wants a divorce, thus uprooting Cal from everything he knows and loves. Soon enough, after failing miserably on the singles scene, Cal meets Jacob Palmer (Ryan Gosling), a young, handsome player who takes on Cal as a protégé and teaches him all about how to be the best man he can be. Before long, Cal is a changed man – but obviously, it doesn’t end there, and Cal has to dodge awkward situations with his kids babysitter, his son’s teacher (Marissa Tomei) and his ex-wife’s new man on the scene (Kevin Bacon), all while Jacob himself finds a woman who is a complete game-changer for him (Emma Stone) and makes him want to change his ways from what he’s taught Cal.

Essentially, Crazy, Stupid, Love feels like a mixture of 40 Year-Old Virgin (again) and The Kids Are Alright, but that might be partially down to the fact Julianne Moore is in it. There are elements of a lot of previous Steve Carell films in the mix here like Dan In Real Life and others, but the mix of big name stars who are so recognisable and play very different characters from each other manage to bring new and interesting elements into the film. Ryan Gosling does a great job of playing the young, hip player and will surely be the reason a lot of women flock to the cinemas for this film, but Emma Stone comes very close to stealing the show with her usual charming characteristics. The only other person that comes close to stealing the spotlight is newcomer Analeigh Tipton as Jessica, the babysitter with an unhealthy crush on the older man Cal.

While there are a lot of laughs in Crazy, Stupid, Love and a lot of original lines courtesy of Mr. Carell and the creative team behind it, it does feel like the film goes on for nearly 30 minutes too long. Going into the last quarter of the film, everything starts becoming a little too predictable and you start to really see the resemblance between this film and every other film that resembles this one, and after the last big twist of the film 30 minutes from the end, everything seems to flatline and just sort of keep rolling on rather than really build towards something. Personally, I think it would have perhaps been a more interesting way to end a film if they had ended it after everyone gets into a big fight and walks away from each other 30 minutes from when the actual end is, but then you can’t expect a film like this to have commercial appeal and have a non-commercial ending at the same time. That would be too much like having your cake and eating it, I suppose, for a film like this.

Crazy, Stupid, Love seems to work well within its own boundaries as a film, but by no stretch of the imagination breaks any kind of mould, but does get redeemed from its unusual line-up of A-Class actors. Crazy, Stupid, Love gets 6 out of 10 from me for being watchable and genuinely funny in places, but ultimately nothing too new.

Rise of the Planet of the Apes (May Contain Spoilers)

With all of the prequels, sequels and reboots coming out of Hollywood in recent years (and quite likely, for the foreseeable future as well), after a while they can tend to become a little like background noise – you know they’re there, but tend not to take much notice of them. A few of these films that have tried to pin themselves to the success of others have proven to be worth watching and genuinely add to what the originals had to offer, and some just tend to let everyone down and ruin what could have been something great. Luckily, Rise of the Planet of the Apes sits firmly in the former.

Taking place many, many years before the original Planet of the Apes (and just to clarify, I am talking about the original Charlton Heston version, and not Tim Burton’s re-imagining. It may have had better visual effects, but still, that’s just not an excuse anymore…), Rise of the Planet of the Apes takes everything back to the very beginning of the simian revolution, and ties up all threads that led up to how apes became the supreme beings on Earth. It all starts with Will Rodman (James Franco), a brilliant scientific mind who is on the verge of creating a cure for Alzheimer’s disease which has struck his father (John Lithgow) very hard. The most successful ape in his trials manages to break free and gets shot right before a presentation, but leaves behind a baby ape with the chemical cure passed down genetically. What Will soon finds out is that his chemical isn’t just a cure, but enhances brain activity as well, and so he studies the ape he’s named Caeser and along with his love interest Caroline (Frieda Pinto), teaches him things no normal ape could comprehend. Eventually, Caeser is an ape with an extraordinary mind and has proven that Will’s cure for Alzheimer’s works. But as his boss (David Oyelewo) begins work on a stronger version of his cure, Caeser gets put into an ape sanctuary where the handlers (Tom Felton and Brian Cox) are cruel and merciless, and the other apes fight for dominance. Before long, Caeser unites his fellow apes together and plots an escape from their prison to the freedom of the outside world.

I can’t really express how impressive and generally exciting Rise of the Planet of the Apes is in a way that is short and sweet enough to mean I don’t go on forever about every little bit, so I’ll try and stick to the basics of what I liked, and just say that it definitely lived up to my expectations of it (I also want to mention that I avoided making any monkey-puns during the writing of this review. I just couldn’t bring myself to do it).

Perhaps the most impressive thing about Rise of the Planet of the Apes is the fact that you end up being very sympathetic towards an animal main character, as Andy Serkis manages to bring some amazing effects and facial emotions to the character of Caeser. You end up truly feeling the plight of this creature and partly feeling that him leading the apes on a revolution is somewhat deserved. Then you remember “Oh wait, I’m a human, I should really be on their side”.

The effects in general are amazing, as well, as each ape manages to take on some kind of personality and play a part towards the end, and you can see how parts of what happen in ROTPOTA leads into the hierarchy of the original.

What I perhaps liked the most about Rise of the Planet of the Apes, though, is the very end parts. Not only do you get to see Caeser with his fellow (now smarter) ape brethren in the freedom of the forests where they belong, but midway through the credits we are all treated to an explanation of how humans died out from the virus created by the stronger version of the Alzheimer’s Cure, and how it spreads throughout the globe, showing how it wasn’t apes themselves that killed off humans, but a virus instead that left Apes as the dominant species. This tied everything together neatly into one, very solid storyline and one amazingly visual film.

It’s actually hard to find too many things I can really fault Rise of the Planet of the Apes on. One small thing perhaps would be the scene on the San Francisco Bridge when a mounted policeman is charging a silverback Gorilla. Now while I admit that I’m no scientist when it comes to animals, it seems to me that no matter what kind of horse you’re riding, if it were to see a gorilla running at it it would almost definitely turn and run the other way and not carry on running! But, as I said, this is a science fiction film and is only really a small flaw in an otherwise brilliantly put together film.

Rise of the Planet of the Apes gets 9 out of 10 for having incredible visual effects an tying everything together in a well-rounded way that also manages to lead in nicely to the original films and have a good script and acting at the same time. It’s a lot to be able to pull off in one film, but Rise definitely seems to have covered all the bases.